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mission. the senior sa senior advisor sae noticed the pope slowing down. we watched pope john paul ii suffer through the last few years of his papacy. maybe he wanted to avoid that. the former cardinal joseph ratzinger was touched by the charges of child abuse in the catholic church. bill: what happens next on the dates that are aren't? >> reporter: he's leaving february 28, 8:00 p.m. local time in rome. that leaves that very important vacancy and sets up a conclave of cardinals. vatican says by mid-march at the latest. vatican says we should have a new pope by esther sunday march 31. pope benedict will not take part in the conclave. usually a conclave happens after a pope dies. 1415 was the last time a pope quit in office. who is the next pope? he could come from developing areas of the world. it guarantees a lot of drama and a lot of black or white smoke coming from the roof is sistine chapel. march report concerns about the pope's health surfaced this past christmas eve. have it can watchers say he looked frail as he delivered the midnight mass. here he is riding in a motorized car
pope in hundreds of years. elected in 2005, he succeeded john paul ii. there have been recent concerns about his health and he's needed help walking, but a vatican spokesperson insists he's not facing anything grave. the cardinals will elect his replacement and hope that can happen by holy week. >> they're looking for someone to preserve the court teachings of the church and be a faith in the church. >> reporter: holy watchers say there doesn't appear to be a front runner. many wonder if the time has come for a non-european leader. >> and more reaction now. an event so rare, it hasn't happened in 600 years. there is shock and appreciation for his bold move. tom fitzgerald gathered reaction from cardinals to parishioners. safe to say no one saw this coming. >> reporter: you're right. in fact, the cardinal told reporters here in washington that he recently visited the pope in rome and that the holy water gave no hint what -- father gave no hint what he was thinking about. after seven years, pope benedict xvi's relatively brief papacy, the end of which is being met with surprise. >> to si
, he watched as a close advisor and close friend, john paul ii, in his last years as pope, and he saw not only the angst that john paul ii went through during that time of suffering, but he also saw how the vatican works when there's a pope that's not able to at his full capacity to do his job. something he obviously had in mind in the past that he could do it. it's very surprising he did. >>steve: father jonathan are you suggesting that the pope saw pope john paul ii in his declining years and said the people of the catholic community need a pope who's at 100% or as close to it as possible, so if i ever get to that stage i'm going to call it quits, and that's what he's doing? >> you know, it seems that that is a big part of his decision. we know how close he was to john paul ii. keep in mind, though, the pope is not a manager. this is why it's so shocking. the pope is not first and foremost the manager. he's the defender of the faith, protecting or guarding the teaching of the church and of the gospel. so you don't need somebody who is a stellar manager at his full capacity necessari
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
, especially considering that he comes after john paul ii, a man at 85 who was able to neither walk or speak really was mumble, towards the end of his life. pope benedict is saying i don't have it anymore. i don't have the strength anymore to bear the -- my mission to carry on the catholic church. >> claudio, is there concern or some speculation that there might be more to the story than that? is there some concern that in fact, there is some health situation that we are not aware of? >> there is a concern. pope benedict xvi has been weak. we never really got his health situation from the vatican. the vatican has always been very secretive about the health of any pope really. we don't really know the extent of the health problems that pope benedict xvi might be suffering right now. but certainly or hopefully we will get to know much more during the next hours. >> talk to me about how the process unfolds. i any a lot of us are familiar with what happens in the tragic event or unfortunate event that a pope passes away. but what would the process be like now if he has now told the world that
by pope john paul ii. now, pope benedict told vatican cardinals that he didn't have the strength to go on. people we spoke to this morning said all of the other popes except one have died in office. why couldn't he? but others were sympathetic. >> i was listening to the catholic radio station and they were saying he wanted to resign even before. right now, he feels this is it. so god bless him. >> reporter: the 85-year-old ally last day of pope will be february 28th. the last time the pope resigned was nearly 600 years ago, when pope gregory xii stepped down in an effort to end the civil war within the church. pope benedict xvi was born in 1927 as joseph ratzinger. he served in the army but deserted and was eventually captured by americans and then released. his decision sets the stage for a new pope to be elected before the end of march. the san francisco archdiocese just opened about a minute ago. we are hoping to speak to someone from there and get reaction on this event. >> all right. tara, you can get more information about the surprise resignation announcement about the pope by goin
remember how pope john paul ii was so young when he was elected. i think he was 56 or 57. a young man. >> he used to go skiing all the time. >> he was elected when he was 78 years old. >> yeah. so we watched him turn into an elderly man that was very frail. remember how long it took, we waited and waited. i can remember i was on a plane when he finally passed. but he didn't -- i mean, he was not healthy at the end and he didn't resign. so that's what i don't really understand, ross, right? >> well, traditionally, they haven't resigned. so -- >> 1415, yeah. >> so he's 2005, he's 86. so that's five, six, seven, eight -- >> i think what we're all dancing around the issue of whether or not there's more to it, right? is that what we're getting at? >> is there something else we don't know about. >> all of them have gotten elderly and they have essentially died in office and that's when they begin to look for a new pope. that is no happening in this case. >> right. you said it would be pure speculation. it's probably best not to specula speculate, at least you filled us in that at this point
succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfire and i know that you are very concerned about the moral decline of the world in general. so, when you think about the next pope, you've got to have to have somebody who will adapt and adhere to the catholic belief system. >> that's right, and i'm confident that the conclave will pick someone like that, an extremely good successor not just to benedict, but john paul iv. ap they had the history, the back-to-back, and i think there are a lot of cardinals out there who could fill those shoes. >> since you have an accurate track record of predicting the next pope, who is in the running? >> well, i'm not sure that i actually predicted it. i hoped that he would be the choice. and-- >> that's close enough. >> i don't know. you know, at this point, i don't think there's any front runner, and i think it is really impossible to predict who it's going to be. but, obviously, you have your favorites choices. i think that las ve
john paul ii back in 1981 said he was following orders from iran's. >> the weapons were from a group that called for an end to the u.s. military presence found on a vessel intercepted in january. >> he was observed operating erratically and low in the water. so a routine boarding was conducted. arms were discovered. we had crew statements that indicated the point of origin was iran. >> beyond yemen, a new british report concludes iran has been expanding its footprint in africa by secretly supplying unmarked ammunition like the shipment uncovered in lagos in 2010 to fuel regional conflicts. the report describes iran's role in the sudan as sustained and potentially escalating. fox news is told that an israeli strike on the sudanese warehouse in objecting was linked to the iran smuggling operation. the head of the house intelligence committee who receives regular briefings on iran. >> it's to escalate arms flow. why, they're feeling the pressure of sanctions. >> while tehran denies involvement, this week authorities link last summer's bus bombing that killed 5 aisraelfiveisraeli tourist
for somebody who will continue the intellectual, the pass storm mission of john paul the 2nd and benedict the 16th. who will be in alignment with them and their cardinals from europe, north america, latin america and africa that can do that very well. jenna: like all popes, really in the position of great power. there is also criticism that sometimes is levied upon someone with such a responsibility. i'm just curious when you reflect back over these last several years with pope benedict, what do you think is important when you look ahead to who is chosen for the next pope but not only for the leadership of the church but a religious leader, a spiritual leader for the world? >> i think one of the great challenges is reconciliation among people of different faiths of integrity, of spirituality, of purifying the church. this has been a great concern of pope benedict and i think his successor will be of the same mind, that, the people have to folk discuss on the person of jesus christ as christians, the work of charity and brotherhood. jenna: mr. anderson, so nice of you to join us today. we
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
of state john kerry. paul ryan is the first republican in the ratings, then marco rubio, jeb bush and speaker boehner. is it a taste of things to come if hillary runs in 2016? >> lefty blogs may be upset at steve doocy. i've seen other things on lefty blogs. i heard that steve doocy actually has calf implants. n now, i don't have any evidence to back that up whatsoever. >> no. >> but, you know, just put a question mark at that. can we put a question mark at the end of that? >> you're referring to, of course, his own personal blog being implanted -- >> sam thought about getting calf implants because we're on a basketball team together. >> that's why he only does television from the waist up. >> exactly. >> just kind of a vanity thing. >> there is a nugget of probably something actually worth discussing here, which is our national obsession with hillary clinton and also the way women are scrutinized in the public lens. >> oh, totally. totally. >> and hillary, in particular, is an incredible sort of sign post for what we'll call the male gaze, given the scrutiny of the way she looks
. we are very grateful for him to part -- for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton , where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a
for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton, where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaking on the panel with him befor
in the developed world. the italians had a claim on the papacy a long time until john paul the iind now, they had a poll and german in the seat and i imagine they would be interested having it back in italy. at the same time, there is very good talent outside europe that might be able to lead the church. i think they'll look widely but won't be simply geographical, what kind of vision will they have going forward and considerations of age and health obviously in this case. i think all those will be on the table. >> they say you want to live in interesting times. certainly, we all are going to get a chance to watch how the pope's voice is absorbed into this discussion by the conclave, right? how much of a voice will he have in this? >> caller: i suspect he will have very little or none. if he's prudent, i don't think he will try to appoint his own successor, let the cardinals choose one of their own because they have to live with the decision. this is an unprecedented situation. popes don't generally pick their successors and i don't think he will. my suspicion is he will retreat from the process
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
, it justice john paul stevens, who remained on the court until he was 90 and is still an avid golfer and tennis player. he has recently written a book, not about himself but about the five chiefs that he has known, to the time he retired from the court. so next question. [laughter] >> justice ginsburg, you have had an amazing career and are leading our legacy in the law. although there is still more to do, looking back, is there anything you would do differently? >> it is a question i do not ask myself, and i will give you two pieces of advice i was given in that regard. when i was a brand new judge on the d.c. circuit, one of my colleagues said, "ruth, i have been at this business a long time, and there is one thing i would like to impart. do your best in each case, but when it is over, when the opinion is out, do not look back. do not worry about things that have passed. go on to the next case and give it your all." that corresponds to advice that my mother gave me, which she summed it up in the phrase "be a lady," and by that she meant do not allow distracting commotions to overwh
view her favorable. president obama second at 51%. paul ryan, marco rubio, john boehner, all far behind. joining me now karen tumulte and david goodfriend. thank you for joining me. the analysis of the seven-point dive there, if that's the accurate word here, why do you believe the approval rating is sinking from december? >> a couple of things. in december, we just come off the large presidential election where both he and his republican opponents spent inordinate amounts of money to get the point across and people weigh the two messages. mitt romney versus barack obama and now left with sort of a generic feeling of the public how do you think things are going? as you put on the screen, most americans don't feel things are going well and will blame that on an incumbent. that having been said, the president's approval ratings are still strong as you point out, strong relative to congress and historical trends. i happen to think that the biggest news out of that poll is even after the republicans tried to tar her with benghazi, hillary clinton remains unbelievably strong and i think that
unless they got cuts, there would have lost that the raid at the end. big loss that debate. john boehner and paul rand did a great job together. you cannot govern from that office, you but you have to be very careful about high-profile last-minute negotiations. i've worked in the white house and three administrations. the president has a tremendous institutional advantage in these kinds of fights. what republicans have to do is avoid these fights, the straps that they are laying. provide an alternative through passing legislation, just to show this is how they would govern if they had the powers of the presidency and the senate. and be careful. there are some rough edges. host: some are not strategy as far as moving the debt ceiling ahead. guest: if they had gone ahead with it, it would have been politically cataclysmic. it was the worst percival -- worst possible ground to make their point. president obama 1. i think it's absolutely crucial for the future of the country that you cannot govern from the house. some house republicans, i am sympathetic to their concerns. their enthusiasm tr
of the staging were a little bit of a mess. what are you looking at, rand paul? beyond marco rubio and rand paul, the other new tea party republican senator ted cruz is busy being pilloried by john mccain and other members of his own party for the way he has comported himself in his first few days in the senate. republicans, republicans are telling reporters that ted cruz is, quote, jim demint without the charm. the insult here being that jim demint was never known for having any charm. two years ahead of time there is always talk that the top republican in the senate, mitch mcconnell may not just face a general election challenge from ashley judd, he may face a tea party challenge from his own party, a named challenger already raising his profile in the state of kentucky against mitch mcconnell. the right wing pundits' fear right now is up in arms about how candidates are handle their fight. they're not on the republican side on this. the fox news channel has gotten rid of sarah palin and dick morris. they have hired scott brown and herman cain and dennis kucinich. hmm. the big headline out of
is an obstacle for chuck hagel's confirmation and vote there in congress and then this john brennan matter is very important to the issue of these targeted drone strikes, rand paul, the senator from kentucky has said that he is willing to hold up that vote on john brennan. if he doesn't receive assurances from the white house that the united states will not target any drone strikes on americans on american soil. so some of this information i think the administration is hoping will at least for now satisfy some of those members with these concerns, wolf. >> it's going to be a tough battle, i take it. both of these confirmations likely to go through next week. but it's by no means a done deal, is it? >> reporter: it's not a -- especially when you have senators saying they may hold up nominees and so we're going to have to wait and see whether or not senator paul is satisfied with the information that he's getting from the white house. but this is perhaps, you know, a break in an impasse that we've seen for many, many months, especially over this issue of benghazi. we heard senator lindsey gr
for the people he elected to serve. he was an inspirational focus point for people like paul and i. we were kids, young men and women when president reagan piqued our interest. >> a lot of people think john boehner will retire in 2014. do you think paul ryan would be a good speaker of the house? >> he would be an exceptional leader, whatever he might be. paul ryan does great things. >> i am getting the hook. scott walker, thank you for being here. [applause] >> you will tag team out with a bill right now. notice to sue proved quick burst to see you. -- nice to see you. >> nice to see you. we are here in washington, governor sam brownback from kansas who is trying to make the trek from topeka. the weather has slowed him down. we will finish with you, governor. >> they have 10 inches of snow that had them. >> he has an excused absence. we will finish with you today. thank you for joining us. i have been talking to the other governors, the same issue. the federal impact of the states and what is happening in the states. heading towards march 1 is the sequester, automatic edger cuts will go into eff
emanating from china. our guest this john reed. a discussion of saving for retirement with paul taylor. live every day at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> i think it's a pretty accurate that they do not live by the roles of both cases. i think they bend the rules to fit their circumstances. i think americans at all westerners tend to be a lot more legalistic and the things that we went in subcontract. once we see things are written on a contract, that is the be all and all. chinese will sign any contract or agree to any trade agreement and after the ink is dry they would try to figure out how to get around the requirements. it is just a relentless drive to get a head. it is what has built the place over the last 30 years. this relentless drive to get a head and to get better and to improve. they see some of the restrictions we put on them in terms of trade. they see that as we are trying to hold china down. we basically operated in a world without rules for years to build our economy up another we are up to the top are try to hamstring them or tie them up with rules and regulations to hold china d
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)